Sarjeant Gallery Whanganui | Tylee Residency
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Tylee Residency

Tylee Cottage Artist-in-Residence Programme

The artist-in-residence programme at Tylee Cottage, a renovated historic building built in 1853, was established in 1986 as a partnership between the Sarjeant Gallery Te Whare o Rehua Whanganui, the Whanganui District Council and the QE11 Arts Council of New Zealand. The programme is now solely funded by Creative New Zealand’s Toi Uru Kahikatea (Arts Development) Investment Programme and managed by the Sarjeant Gallery.

The programme is one of the longest running of its kind in New Zealand and in 2016 we celebrated its thirtieth anniversary. Over 50 artists have been in residence and include some of the country’s leading practitioners. The residency provides a unique opportunity for an artist to develop a new body of work under less pressured circumstances.

Tylee Cottage

As a result, the residency has the dual benefit of bringing exciting new artists into the city and allows us to include innovative contemporary new work in our exhibition programme that is a unique reflection of each of the artist’s time spent in residence. The residency programme attracts a high calibre of applicants.

An installation photograph from our recent exhibition Vignettes – 30 Years at Tylee Cottage 1986-2016

Vignettes – 30 Years at Tylee Cottage 1986-2016

19 November 2016 – 12 February 2017

2016 marked the 30th anniversary of the Sarjeant Gallery’s artist-in-residence programme at historic Tylee Cottage. The inaugural resident was photographer Laurence Aberhart, since then the Gallery has hosted more than fifty artists, many who have gone on to become some of New Zealand’s most accomplished visual arts practitioners.

Over the 2016-2017 summer period, the Gallery brought together an exhibition Vignettes – 30 Years at Tylee Cottage 1986-2016 that marked the thirtieth anniversary of the residency, including many of the works that have responded specifically to Whanganui. Read ArtZone Issue 66 September 2016 article here

To view a complete list of former Tylee residents, click here

Four New Zealand artists have been selected for the 2018/2019 Tylee residencies thanks to generous funding support from Creative New Zealand. Read more

 

A conversation with the current Tylee Cottage resident Julia Holden (Sept 2018 – January 2019)

 

Julia Holden. Picture by Martin Hunter

 

HOW DO YOU DESCRIBE YOURSELF AS AN ARTIST?
I’m primarily a painter incorporating elements of performance, sculpture, photography and sometimes film. I also animate paintings, painting multiple individual portraits, photographing the painting and linking those images by using old school stop motion animation techniques.

WHAT IS YOUR PROPOSED UNDERTAKING WHILST AT TYLEE COTTAGE?
It‘s two fold. There will be a live performance painting which will reference works by and about women from the current 125: Celebrating Women from the Collection exhibition drawn from the Sarjeant’s permanent collection. Part two will be a continuation into my recent investigations of the still life genre, entirely experimental and referencing works by well-known still life painters. The residency has given me the luxury and pleasure of the gift of time that allows me to make these explorations.

WHAT MEDIUMS DO YOU WORK IN?
Multiple – clay, paint, photography, performance.

WHERE’S HOME?
Christchurch since 2012

PLACE OF BIRTH?
I’m a gypsy

CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT YOUR EXPERIENCES MAKING YOUR ART. FOR INSTANCE, HOW LONG DOES A WORK GENERALLY TAKE YOU? DO YOU DO RESEARCH? IS YOUR CREATION PROCESS VERY PHYSICAL, VERY CEREBRAL? IS THERE A LONG GESTATION PERIOD?
The portrait work for me is a true collaboration between myself and the person who is acting as my living canvas be that person an artist or a person in the community. There is a dialogue and an intimacy which comes about as a result of creating the work because it is based on the conversation and the trust that develops. It is a collaboration in a really true sense in that they are an active part of the portrait. The actual painting happens fairly quickly both because I don’t want my subject to be under the paint too long but also because I am looking to capture a very fresh, wet, immediate and visceral outcome.

IS THERE AN AUDIENCE YOU PARTICULARLY WANT TO REACH OR A MESSAGE THAT YOU HOPE TO COMMUNICATE?
I’m really interested in the conversation that happens between artists across time. Visual works are not absolutely anchored to time and place – in remaking them they both an homage and a kind of a compliment and something else happens too. Looking at works that have already been filtered through the mind of another artist is really interesting to me and it feels like I’m in a direct conversation with them as I make the work. It gives me the excuse to look deeply into a work that I might feel very drawn too and that the subject has a connection too also. I am in collaboration with my subject and I am also in collaboration with the artist that I am referencing.

ARE THERE THEMES THAT SEEM TO POP UP AGAIN AND AGAIN IN YOUR WORK? WHAT ARE THEY? DO YOU KNOW WHY THEY ARE THERE?
I am not a portraitist as such but portraiture is a really great way of talking about who we are right now and – I really like looking at and working with people.

WHAT OR WHO INFLUENCES YOU? IS THERE SOMETHING YOU FIND PARTICULARLY INSPIRING?
I am surrounded by totally amazing capable creative women of all ages who totally inspire me. I am particularly impressed by this next generation of younger women who are so much freer and so much more vocal than my generation. It is really exciting.

How to apply

Applications for our next season of residencies – September, 2018 – January, 2020 – are now closed.